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projects:wobblesphere [2020/07/22 21:50]
robin
projects:wobblesphere [2020/07/22 22:18] (current)
robin
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 I kept the door stopper springs and LED rings I used in Wobble Garden as the combo worked quite well, and 3D-printed holders that the door stopper springs could be attached to with their screws. Combined with the soldered PCB-to-PCB connections,​ this was surprisingly rigid and gave the sphere a satisfying stability. I kept the door stopper springs and LED rings I used in Wobble Garden as the combo worked quite well, and 3D-printed holders that the door stopper springs could be attached to with their screws. Combined with the soldered PCB-to-PCB connections,​ this was surprisingly rigid and gave the sphere a satisfying stability.
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-On the software side, I'm re-using the code I wrote for Wobble Garden, which uses Python and pygame for rapid prototyping of animations and sends the LED data over USB to the Teensy, which renders it and sends the touch data back to the Python script. This works fairly well, and allows me to get a performance of more than 150 fps, leaving a fair bit of performance leeway for larger spheres.+I'm still working on a proper mount, so far I just used some aluminium extrusions to make a quick '​popsicle'​ style stand, but I'm also considering suspending the sphere in free air using thin wires. 
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 +On the software side, I'm re-using the code I wrote for Wobble Garden, which uses Python and pygame for rapid prototyping of animations and sends the LED data over USB to the Teensy, which renders it and sends the touch data back to the Python script. This works fairly well, and allows me to get a performance of more than 150 fps, leaving a fair bit of performance leeway for larger spheres. ​The interactions and animations I have so far are all procedural and fairly simple (see video below), and I'm planning on spending more time on small games, visualisations and other specific applications,​ potentially opening up the python library to other artists too. 
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